Jesus’ Resurrection

The Vine

It seemed that everything had gone wrong. And then, seemingly out of nowhere, everything changed forever. Jesus of Nazareth, whom many believed was the Christ of God, was crucified. Then, when the disciples were in despair, attempting to figure out what went wrong, they hear that Jesus of Nazareth was alive again, resurrected from the dead (cf. Luke 24:19-24). The tomb was empty. Nothing would ever be the same again.

The resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth is the centerpiece of the Christian religion. While Jesus’ birth, life, and death are significant in and of themselves, without Jesus’ resurrection, they are all ultimately meaningless, and we would still be lost in our sins (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:14-19). The Christ crucified and resurrected was the theme of the message of the Apostles, and the resurrection was the basis of the future hope of transformation (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:20-58).

We read about Jesus’ resurrection in Matthew 28:1-20, Mark 16:1-20, Luke 24:1-53, John 20:1-21:23, and 1 Corinthians 15:1-58. After Jesus died, His soul went to Paradise (cf. Luke 23:43), and His body was sealed in Joseph of Arimathea’s rock-cut tomb after it was wrapped in linen and covered with seventy-five pounds of spices and aloes. On the third day, the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and some of the women came to finish the anointing of the body of Jesus, and found the large rock in front of the tomb rolled away. Two angels were there, informed the women of what has taken place, and told them to go and make it known to the disciples. Peter and John ran to the tomb, saw it empty with the linen cloths carefully folded to the side. They believed; they just did not know what happened! Mary, meanwhile, spoke to someone whom she believes is the gardener, wanting to know where the body of Jesus was taken. He responded to her; He was no gardener, but Jesus Himself, resurrected from the dead!

The idea of resurrection in the New Testament is not merely life after death; instead, it involves “life after life after death.” Mary and the disciples found the tomb empty and Jesus in a bodily form (cf. Luke 24:39). Nevertheless, Jesus’ body is not the same as it was before since He can now transcend space and time restraints; it has been transformed somehow. The resurrection therefore involves the re-animation or re-creation of the physical body, the return of the soul to it, and the transformation of that body into something “trans-physical” or something of the sort.

Jesus will later appear to Simon Peter, two disciples walking to Emmaus, ten of the disciples, all eleven disciples, James His brother, and 500 brethren at one time over the period of forty days after His death. He instructed them regarding Himself and the mission for the Kingdom that they would soon begin. After that forty day period, Jesus ascended to the Father in Heaven (Acts 1:1-11). At that point Jesus, as the “one like a Son of Man,” received an everlasting dominion from the Ancient of Days (Daniel 7:13-14); Stephen, in a vision, saw the “Son of Man” standing at the right hand of God when he saw Jesus while being stoned (Acts 7:55-56); Saul of Tarsus saw the Lord on the road to Damascus, and based on it considered himself an eyewitness of the resurrection (Acts 9:3-6, 1 Corinthians 9:1, 15:4-9). In the 60s CE, long after Jesus’ ascension, Paul spoke of Jesus as still presently human (Greek anthropos, 1 Timothy 2:5). The Lord Jesus therefore remains fully God and fully man, having died never to die again (Romans 6:8-11): He remains in the resurrection body, and thus remains the Son of Man and Son of God, and will return thus one day (Matthew 25:31, Acts 1:11).

The Bible’s claims regarding the resurrection of Jesus are startling, and yet they represent the foundation of the belief that Jesus really is Lord and Christ (cf. Acts 2:36). Since Christianity stands or falls on the legitimacy of the resurrection, many throughout time have attempted to discredit it by positing alternative explanations. Those explanations, however, never account for all of the evidence. Both the “swoon theory” and the “wrong tomb theory” require more faith to believe than the Bible’s claims. The “hallucination theory” cannot explain why people would claim to see Jesus only during a forty day period. The “stolen body theory” is inconsistent with the transformation of the disciples and the testimony of their lives. The “spiritual theory” cannot make sense of the claim of the empty tomb. In the end, the only story that makes sense of the empty tomb, the eyewitness accounts, and the transformation of the disciples is that Jesus of Nazareth was really raised from the dead by the power of God!

Jesus’ resurrection changes everything. By virtue of Jesus’ death and resurrection, the Apostles proclaim that God made Him Lord and Christ (Acts 2:36). Jesus conquers death through the resurrection, giving us hope that we also can conquer death (1 Corinthians 15:54-57). With sin and death defeated through Jesus, we have no reason to fear anyone or anything! Jesus’ resurrection proves beyond doubt that there will be a day of reckoning for all mankind (Acts 17:30-31). The resurrection shows that Jesus is the first fruit: as He was raised from the dead, so we now can look forward to the day when we also will rise from the dead (Romans 8:18-25, 1 Corinthians 15:20-58). In the resurrection, a new creation is able to burst forth into the old: even though we may still suffer on account of sin and death, we can spiritually die and be raised again through baptism and be new creatures in Jesus’ spiritual Kingdom (Romans 6:3-7, 2 Corinthians 5:17). Ultimately we cherish the hope of our own resurrection based on Jesus’ resurrection: on that day we will be like Him, and will abide with Him forever (1 Corinthians 15:20-58, 1 John 3:2).

Jesus, in His resurrection, demonstrates that death is not the end. Hope is able to spring anew. Jesus is Risen! Let us praise God, and obtain the victory through Jesus Christ!

Ethan R. Longhenry

Q&A: Campus Preachers

Q: I see some “preachers” on campus who spend their time yelling at people and accusing them of sin. Why do they do that? Is that the way we should be telling people about Jesus?

A: We have spoken somewhat of such persons in Fanatics.

Most people who are motivated to go out and condemn people in their sins have developed a theology that conflates the prophetic witness of the Old Testament to Israel with a belief in the United States of America as God’s chosen nation. Such people believe that all Americans should be Christians because God has chosen America; therefore, they are not to be evangelized as if they knew nothing about Jesus but instead as apostatizing and backsliding chosen people.

There is no basis upon which to assert that God has chosen the United States of America in any special way. There is no reason to believe that the United States of America is the new Israel or has been granted a special election. Instead, in the USA, there are righteous people and there are sinners, just as there are in every nation. Those in the world, as sinners, are to hear the good news of Jesus’ life, death, resurrection, lordship, and return, just as in the book of Acts (cf. Acts 2:14-36, Acts 17:22-31, etc.). They are sinners, separated from God; we should not speak to them or presume that they have understanding of God, but exhort them as the Apostles before us did (cf. ibid., Ephesians 2:1-18).

Therefore such is not the way to tell people about Jesus; it is the way to repel people and keep them far away from Jesus and salvation, and thus is truly lamentable. God does not want unbelievers to be condemned and roast for their sins; such is why He sent His Son to die for them, and wishes for them to be saved (John 3:16-17, 1 Timothy 2:4). We do well to love such people and point them to Jesus for salvation and hope!

Do you have questions about the Bible or Christianity? We’d love to discuss them!

Do you have anything to add or discuss regarding the question or answer? Please let us know in the comments below.

Thanks!

The Resurrection

The Vine

From death comes life.

This statement is paradoxical yet proves true in our lives. As one day, month, or year ends, another begins. A fire consumes a forest, and new growth is given an opportunity to rise. One creature is killed and eaten so that another creature might live. And so it is with Christianity and its teachings regarding the resurrection.

“Resurrection” involves the idea of coming back to life after death. In the Old Testament, the prophets Elijah and Elisha bring dead people back to life through the power of God (1 Kings 17:17-24, 2 Kings 4:18-37, Hebrews 11:35). In the New Testament, Jesus raised the son of the widow of Nain, Jairus’ daughter, and Lazarus from the dead as well (Luke 7:10-17, 8:40-42, 49-56, John 11:1-45). In all of these circumstances, a person was physically dead and then brought back to physical life.

Yet every “new” day, month, or year will also pass away. “New” plant growth goes old and dies as well. Creatures who eat other creatures might be eaten in turn but will certainly meet their end in some way or another. All of the people above who were resurrected died again as well.

Yet God, in the New Testament, makes a promise regarding a better resurrection, one that does not end in yet another death. This resurrection is considered most properly as “life after life after death,” and Jesus is considered its “firstfruits,” the first of an intended many (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:20). We can gain understanding about this resurrection by considering the descriptions of Jesus’ resurrection in Matthew 28:1-17, Mark 16:1-8, Luke 24:1-53, and John 20:1-21:25.

Jesus died physically on the cross but remained alive spiritually in Paradise until the third day (Luke 23:43-46). As the Gospel accounts demonstrate, God raised Jesus from the dead on the third day: the tomb was empty, for Jesus’ soul/spirit were united again with His physical body. Over a forty day period Jesus frequently appeared to His followers, establishing that He was no phantasm but flesh and blood, although changed, since He apparently transcended the space-time continuum. He then ascended to heaven with the promise of returning as He departed (Acts 1:11).

Paul established Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection as the fundamental core of the Gospel in which we stand (1 Corinthians 15:1-11). Those who deny the resurrection from the dead ultimately deny Jesus and Christianity, for if the dead are not raised, Jesus was not raised, and if Jesus was not raised, then our faith is futile, we are lost in our sins, and of all people most to be pitied (1 Corinthians 15:12-19).

And yet Paul assures Christians in 1 Corinthians 15:20-23 that Jesus is risen from the dead, and we can have confidence that in Jesus those who belong to Christ will rise when He comes. According to the New Testament, Jesus will return one day (e.g. Matthew 25:1-46). When He returns, all of the dead in the grave will hear His voice and come out (John 5:28-29). This resurrection, by necessity, involves the re-animation and/or re-constitution of the physical body: that which was from dust and had returned to dust will begin to come to life again from the dust (cf. Genesis 3:19). Since the “psychical,” or natural body, the one empowered by the breath (Gk. psuche) of life, is perishable, corruptible, and mortal, it will then be transformed to be the “pneumatical” or spiritual body, the one empowered by the soul (Gk. pneuma), and thus imperishable, incorruptible, and immortal (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:35-54). In this way the dead will rise first and those who remained alive will then be transformed (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18), and such is the redemption of the body earnestly desired in Romans 8:18-25. From this point on the righteous will be forever in the presence of the Lord, having gained the final victory over sin and death through Him (1 Corinthians 15:55-58, 1 Thessalonians 4:17-18).

From Jesus’ death comes life: spiritual life through faith in Him and the salvation which comes through His blood, and the promise of eternal life in the resurrection with Him (cf. Romans 5:6-11, 6:3-7). The resurrection changes everything: there is more to life than this existence, death and evil can be overcome, and we can maintain hope in the ultimate realization of God’s intentions for His creation. Through the resurrection life gains its meaning as preparation for eternity. Let us praise God for the hope of resurrection in Christ Jesus and place our trust in Him forever!

Ethan R. Longhenry

Love

The Vine

“Love is all you need.” So spoke some of the “prophets” of our day, and they were right. We could be very wealthy, but if we were not loved by anyone, we would feel hollow and empty. But if we love and are loved, even if we have very few earthly possessions to our name, we can be happy and content. In fact, long ago, a man named Paul said something quite similar:

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing (1 Corinthians 13:1-3 ESV).

Paul understood how love was more important than anything else. No amount of wisdom, understanding, or power would have any value if he did not have love.

We can understand life in terms of the pursuit of love and being loved. From the womb we want to be loved by our parents. We grow up and look for that special someone who will love us unconditionally as we love them. We want to be surrounded by people who care about us and for whom we care deeply as well.

But if love is so fundamental and basic to our existence, why do we struggle to love and be loved like we should? Why is there so little love around? Part of our problem is how we understand what love is. In the Bible, Paul provides an excellent definition of what love really involves:

Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends (1 Corinthians 13:4-8a ESV).

As we know from experience, receiving true love is a beautiful and wonderful thing. We like it when people are patient with us and kind toward us. Yet we often find it difficult to express to others those same benefits, especially when we do not like them very much.

Such is why true love is not an emotion or a feeling. Love is a decision impacting the way we think, feel, and act. Feelings come and go; love endures all things. Emotions can sway back and forth, up and down, hot and cold; love is not irritable or resentful. Love springs forth from the active decision to love.

But if we are to love, we cannot insist on our own way or desire. True love involves seeking the best interest of the one we love even if it costs us greatly. Love, therefore, must be sacrificial: we must suffer loss for the one whom we love. It might be our time, energy, devotion, care, resources, or a number of other things. Love can never truly be about us; it must be about the ones we love.

And yet even if love is about the best interest of the one loved, such love cannot compel or coerce. We might think we know the best interest of the ones we love, but they may not see it that way. Love is not rude or arrogant; we cannot truly love while forcing people to act as we think they should. This does not mean that love comes without any standards; love rejoices with the truth, and cannot rejoice at wrongdoing. Love cannot compel or coerce, but love cannot enable bad thoughts, attitudes, or behaviors, either.

To love is to hope and trust: we seek the best interest of others, and in so doing hope that others will seek our best interest as well. True, self-sacrificial love is difficult enough to provide to others when we exist within a loving and caring environment; it is far more difficult when we do not feel loved in return. Nevertheless, love cannot force, since it does not insist on its own way. We must have confidence in love as the best way forward even though we will assuredly experience rejection and pain because we have dared to love. We must cherish our confidence that it is better to love others with the hope of being loved, risking the rejection or pain that comes along with it, than it is to be unloving and to miss out on the greatest blessings of life we find in love.

We humans easily slip into selfishness, inertia, and fear. We think it easier to just take care of ourselves. Despite good intentions toward others, we do not actually put the effort into seeking their best interest. We are afraid of investing our energies and resources into other people because we are not guaranteed good will and similar benefits in return.

But is such a life really worth living? What would our lives be like if no one had ever loved us? What if no one invested their energies or resources into us? We would not be here; we would have starved as infants!

But why is love so important? We are made to love and for love because the God who made us is love (1 John 4:8). God created all things and cares for all things because He loves them (1 John 4:7). No one has ever deserved or earned God’s love; God freely loves us despite our rebellion against Him and His purposes (Romans 5:6-11, 8:7-8). As God, He has control over all things, and can do as He wishes; He has no need for mankind, and yet He loves us and cares for us, seeking our best interest, willing to give of His Son for our sins (Romans 5:6-11, 8:31-32)! God has made it clear in Scripture what is our best interest–to follow the way of truth versus the ways of unrighteousness– and we will all be held accountable for our thoughts, words, and deeds one day (cf. Acts 17:30-31, 2 Timothy 3:16-17). Yet God has never forced anyone to serve Him or seek after His purposes.

What shall we do? Will we put our trust in God and the power of His love, or will we shrink back in our fears? Are we bold enough to hope in the redeeming power of love to heal our own brokenness and the brokenness of others? God has loved us, having made us in love and to love. We do well to love God and love others in return, even if they do not love us, trusting that the way of love is always better than the way of indifference, selfishness, and fear. Join us at The Word Bible Study as we seek to learn more about God’s love and how we can best love one another, and let us work together to praise God for His love!

The Vine

The Vine is designed to strengthen and build you up spiritually, giving you something to think about and apply to your life and your relationship with God and others. It is a publication of the Venice church of Christ, published monthly while school is in session.

Why Are We Here?

The Vine

Why Are We Here?

I know–it’s a hard question, and it requires a lot of thought. We’re busy with school, with work, and with life in general, and it’s hard to find time to think about a question like this.

But let’s think about it for a moment. Why are we in school? Why do we work? Where do we see ourselves heading in life? Why do we bother with any of this at all?

Then again, why do we ask these questions? Why do we think we should have purpose or direction in life? Some people think life really has no purpose: we live, we take up space, we give birth to more people, we die, and that’s all there is to it. After all, if we are really just advanced animals and all there is to life is what we can hear, see, smell, taste, and touch, what purpose would life have beyond taking care of the necessities of life and reproduction?

Does that answer satisfy you? I hope not! What a depressing and sad world it would be if life really had no purpose! Deep down, most of us believe (and hope) that we are here for a reason.

If there is a reason for living and if our lives are to have some purpose, who came up with that reason and purpose? How can we discover that reason and purpose?

The fact that we can even think of these questions shows that there is something different about humanity. We do not see lizards or mosquitoes asking these questions or wondering why they are here. Humans have the ability to reason, and that is what makes us different. This means that we know that we exist, that there was a time before we physically existed, and that we are going to die. We are able to understand cause and effect and think in other advanced ways. Why do we have this ability, unlike other animals, and who set all of this up this way?

The Bible can provide some direction for us. The Bible claims to be the message from the God who created the heavens and the earth to humans. This message describes how God made humans in His own image–a spiritual being with a soul and the opportunity to live a full and meaningful life. The way God works can be seen in His creation which we enjoy, and God made all men from one man and so designed them that they might seek to learn more about Him.

Have you ever wondered if there was more to life than what we can see and feel? Have you ever had an experience you could not explain, but one that pointed to some kind of reality beyond our own? These types of things happen because there is more to this life than the physical realm and there is a spiritual realm beyond our perception.

The Bible talks about God and how He created mankind so that they could seek Him, but this still does not tell us why we’re here and where we’re going in life.

The Bible shows us that God created man as He did in order to interact with him–basically, God wanted a relationship with people! The Bible says that God is love. The Bible also shows us that God is Three Persons as One in relationship– the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit in perfect relationship, and in the same way God wants to have a perfect, loving relationship with us! After He created people, He constantly spoke with them, hoping that they would listen to Him and do what He said so that they could enjoy that loving relationship.

But God does not force anyone to follow Him– people can choose to follow God or to go in a different path. Sadly, because people have gone in that different path, God’s great creation has been damaged by rebellion and sin. God did not intend for us to be sick, to suffer, or to die. All of those things happen because we have many times chosen to do what God does not want us to do. When we don’t do what God wants us to do, or we do what God doesn’t want us to do, those sins separate us from God. It keeps us from having that relationship God wants to have with us. As long as we remain out of that relationship with God, we are dead spiritually and risk being separated from God, the Source of life, forever! And the worst thing about it is that we cannot do anything about it by ourselves, since all the times we are doing what God wants us to do cannot undo the bad things we have done!

We are in a sad state! We are alone, without God, and without hope in the world! It’s little wonder that we are often so sad, lonely, and depressed!

But remember how God is love? Even though we have done bad things, God still wants to have a relationship with us. But all the evil in the world–sin, suffering, and death–had to be dealt with first. God did that by sending the Son into the world. He experienced suffering and death for sin even though He did nothing wrong, and in so doing He defeated sin and death. On the third day after He died God raised Him from the dead, and He lives to this very day. He returned to Heaven– that spiritual dimension beyond what we can see– and from there rules heaven and earth.

The Son–Jesus–did what we could not do when He died for our sins. We now can have that relationship with God by placing our trust in Jesus, declaring that He is Lord, by changing our thoughts and ways–trying to do what God says to do–and by being immersed in water for the forgiveness of our sins in the name of Jesus Christ. Then we can begin to become the people God wants us to be–like Jesus His Son, doing good for people, doing what God wants us to do.

When we have that relationship with God, we will never have to feel alone again. God will be with us even when things do not seem to be going well for us in life. We can trust that our lives have purpose and meaning, because we know who we are and we have hope regarding where we are going.

Where are we going? God has promised in the Bible that a day of judgment is coming. If we have a restored relationship with God, we will share in the same resurrection that Jesus experienced and we will live with God forever, experiencing peace and joy beyond imagination. But if we do not have a restored relationship with God, we will be cut off from Him forever and will suffer greatly!

The members of the Venice church of Christ hope that you want to have a relationship with God your Creator. We hope that you want to learn how to do what God wants you to do, because that’s what we want to do. We want you to enjoy that relationship with God but also to have a relationship with us as we all try to do what God wants us to do. If you would like to talk more about God and His purpose for you, please call us at 310.351.1199 or contact us here; we also invite you to visit with us at our assemblies and Bible studies. Thanks for reading this material, and we hope to hear from you soon!

The Vine

The Vine is designed to strengthen and build you up spiritually, giving you something to think about and apply to your life and your relationship with God and others. It is a publication of the Venice church of Christ, published monthly while school is in session.